Posts in Alcohol Marketing

What Low & No Means For Short & Strong

June 14th, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing, Spirits 0 thoughts on “What Low & No Means For Short & Strong”

Recently this piece featured in Drinks International, you can read it below (obviously!) or here on the Drinks International site itself Low and no: How brands can adapt

The changes the “low and no” market bring to the table are numerous as well as vast. The impact this is having on classic “shots” brands could spell trouble for many big names on the back bar. At YesMore we love looking at all aspects of the trends we see in this industry, we hope you enjoy the read. 


‘The rise of the teetotal student’, ‘Low and no category exploding’. The daily headlines are hard to miss. There’s a huge trend in the drinks world right now: people are drinking less – and brands are investing and innovating to serve this market.

However: there’s another side to this trend, and one that is likely to have a negative impact for many drinks producers: if ‘low and no’ is where it’s at, what does this mean for the ‘short and strong’?

📸- Photo by Francisco Galarza on Unsplash

Let’s be clear – we aren’t talking about cocktails, or stronger drinks to be sipped and savoured. This is about the change in a specific occasion of drinking – those ‘single serve/shot’ items, often consumed for the sake of getting drunk, rather than any additional pleasure. no one has ever gone for a quiet Jagerbomb or two with the idea of staying sober. The rituals of drinking and nights out are shifting.

WHAT’S HAPPENNING?  

What’s changing – and what can brands at risk do about this threat?

The big shift is in the occasion – what’s declining is the activity of drinking to get drunk. Therefore ‘shot’ culture is likely to decline – figures already reported suggest a 2.1% decrease in volume sales in 2018.

So if occasion is king, we can see why this spells trouble for brands like Jagermeister, Apple Sourz, Goldschlager, Aftershock and more.

Other drinks that are occasionally consumed in this way may also feel an impact – ie tequila, Sambuca and schnapps. As responsible drinking messaging rises rightly to the fore, brands need to consider how they are perceived and marketed, and move away from these occasions.

So what occasions are there for the short and strong in a marketplace of low and no drinkers?

COCKTAILS 

Cocktails offer one a way to move to a more considered market strategy. If your brand can be mixed and evolve into a more rounded drinking experience, then this is an option. This will be more successful for some brands than others, but one that all should consider. In some cases, this may also involve some brand repositioning work.

📸 – Photo by Helena Yankovska on Unsplash

HERITAGE 

Heritage is another area brands could focus on.: if a drink can be enjoyed as a complex, pleasurable product to be savored – such as tequila – then brands need to work to convey this message and brand history. Of course, many many tequila brands already do this – something other brands could learn from. It may even come down to protecting brands more vigorously – preventing stockists from serving your particular tequila with salt and lemon, for example (delisting the brand from venues that don’t comply).

📸 – Photo by David García Sandoval on Unsplash

DRINKING OCCASIONS ABROAD  

Take an outside view: consider how drinks are positioned in other countries. Though a different drinking occasion, the idea of the early evening ‘aperitivo’ has been successfully marketed in Britain by brands such as Aperol and new vermouth brands. Schnapps might focus on its association with Apres Ski, or as the traditional addition to Gluhwein. Even Jaegermeister, with its history dating back to 1934 was started as a digestif herbal liqueur.

📸 – Photo: Lizzie Munro

THE DRINKING “EVENT” 

Younger consumers are also changing how they experience a night out; with ‘event’ venues around darts, ping pong, golf and more becoming increasingly popular. In these places, there’s something other to do that sit and drink which is also changing the occasion dynamic. If your brand can find a way to become part of that occasion, then this could offer some way to preserve share.

There will still be a market for these drinks, but the next few years is likely to see it decline. Brands need to act now to ensure they position and protect their products through this change.

Puttshack Shepherds Bush

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk 

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The Alcohol Issue, Part One

June 11th, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing 0 thoughts on “The Alcohol Issue, Part One”

STUDENT ALCOHOL ATTITUDES, BEHAVIOURS & RELATIONSHIP

Students are drinking less. We know this. But how is this affecting the life of the typical student?

The Alcohol Issue is a result of seven focus groups, a nationwide survey and interviews with prominent figures from across the alcohol industry to discover the truth behind student attitudes towards alcohol.

We explored everything from peer pressure to mental health to what drinks students are loyal to (spoiler alert: the cheap ones).

DOWNLOAD THE FINDINGS: The Alcohol Issue, Part One

The report includes sections on:

👉 The Sober Student

👉 Brand (Dis)loyalty

👉 Alcohol Free drinks

👉 Peer Pressure

👉 Pub Pressure

👉 Mental Health


Read more about YesMore Agency research in The Grocer, Just Drinks, Food & Beverage News, and more.

 

Want to know more about us? Take a look at YesMore Agency services, or contact us on hello@yesmore.co.uk for a free consultation arming you with advice on how to transform your marketing. See some of our Instagram video and cinemagraph content for Grey Goose we produced recently too.

 

Booze Views: The verdict on Coca-Cola’s premium mixer play

June 4th, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing, Booze Views, Spirits 0 thoughts on “Booze Views: The verdict on Coca-Cola’s premium mixer play”

Just look at the bottle though. And that label. It’s got the batch number on it. It’s got the stretchy, all-caps sans serif, orientation-at-right-angles thing going on with the type. So craft. So premium.

I’ll take a moment out from being facetious and jumping straight on the damned-if-they-do bandwagon to say upfront that there’s a lot that’s intriguing about the Signature Mixers range that Coca-Cola announced last month. And there are most likely a few things they’ve got right. The cynicism of this launch is so obvious it doesn’t merit discussion, but it would be too easy to write this off as simply the hyperglobalmegabrand showing up late to the party doing an embarrassing dad dance.

IT’S BEEN DONE WORSE PREVIOUSLY 

Certainly, it’s nothing like as crass as Fosters slapping Crafted to Refresh on its cans and being done with it. Don’t believe me? Then look no further than the hideous render below dear readers. Whereas Coca-Cola has gone to no small amount of effort on the branding exercise. More than that – it’s actually come up with a new product. But the early signs smack of this placing a little too much emphasis on the former.

📸 – fosters.co.uk

For one, take a lot at the slapdash copy used to launch the range. Of course, the product landing page confidently proclaims it “expertly crafted”. Not like the regular stuff. We get a hoard of work experience kids to piss on a hill of brown sugar cubes for that. Then there’s the opening line:

There’s nothing better than relaxing with the refreshing taste of Coca-Cola. 

There we are. Nothing. Better. I take back the cheap sugarpiss shot. Now, knowing how little attention is typically paid to the extraneous content around the creative – like, oh, how you actually communicate your product in long-form copy – I’m tempted not to read too much into this. But it is notable how heavily the brand continues to lean on how its flagship product tastes. Equally significant, of course, is the launch of Coke’s new energy drink, which is pegged on “the great taste of Coke”. The Signature Mixers are a departure from that.

📸 – packworld.com

Now, tasting notes are notoriously prone to bombast, pretentiousness and downright nonsense. You know – pretentious copywriting shithousery of the highest order. And these are no exception. I direct your attention to the herbal one:

Balancing refreshing notes of lemongrass with the earthy tones of dill seed and tagetes, it is an inviting mixer with a refreshing, simple profile that pairs beautifully with amber whiskies and most types of rum.

Tagetes, obviously. Well, they’re not tasting notes unless there’s at least one ingredient you have to Google. How else will you remember what a worthless, pathetic moron you were before your rum and coke was transformed by the earthy tones of… marigolds. (The flowers; not rubber gloves – though I’d be interested to see what kind of improving effect they could have on the great taste of Coke.)

UPSHOT

Upshot: it doesn’t quite taste or look like Coke. Of course, it can’t and be a convincingly premium product. But the warning sign is that it seems to be relying more on packaging and a list of esoteric ingredients than a fully formed proposition.

An apt analogy: Walkers was enormously successful in positioning Sensations as a classier product because it realised that posh crisps fitted a specific social function. Friends round; birthday party; Friday desk beers and snacks. The magic dust of maltodextrin and garlic powder had comparatively little to do with it – new flavours that sound sufficiently premium and well-executed branding, both of which led the product to fill a gap in the national shopping basket.

📸 – Hugo Goggin

OVERALL 

Coke’s proposition seems more to be formed from a vague notion that dark spirits are having a moment and the Coke you’ve been mixing them with until now isn’t up to the task.

Craft drinks – alcoholic and soft alike – have come to prominence for exactly that reason: taste over mindless consumption. But for a brand built on the “great taste” of its flagship product, that narrative requires a very clear story to circumvent. The one that Coke is peddling with the Signature Mixers range is just a little too muddled, too tenuous and too niche to do so successfully.

📸 – Techregister

I could well be wrong, but I find the idea that anyone will earnestly be cracking out the posh Coke “because it goes with woody whiskies” this summer a stretch.

I ought to be curious enough to make the effort to try the Signature Mixers series as soon as I see it on shelves (which is imminently). But, full disclosure: as someone who’s always found Coke repulsive, I don’t find the prospect of marigolds in the stuff that much of a sell.

Cheers,
Rich

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk 

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Panelists sharing their views on whether alcohol marketing can improve society's relationship between mental health and alcohol, at YesMore Agency London.

Mental Health + Alcohol: Can marketing inspire a positive change in society’s relationship with alcohol?

May 21st, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing, Mental Health 0 thoughts on “Mental Health + Alcohol: Can marketing inspire a positive change in society’s relationship with alcohol?”

For those of you that know YesMore Agency, you’ll know that we’re an alcohol marketing agency. What many people don’t (yet) know is that one of the key reasons we specialised in alcohol marketing was to use our expertise and experience to, ultimately, drive a cultural shift in our society’s relationship with drinking alcohol for the wrong reasons.

W E ’ R E   O N   A   M I S S I O N
T O   I N S P I R E   P O S I T I V E  C H A N G E
I N   O U R    S O C I E T Y ’ S
R E L A T I O N S H I P   
W I T H   A L C O H O L

It’s a topic close to our hearts, and it’s our belief that much of the drinks industry and marketing industry could be doing more to understand how poor mental health can lead to people using alcohol as a vice. For example it’s not uncommon for people to make mental links between, say, a bad day at work and unwinding with a drink, or to drink wine and eat chocolate after a breakup, when lonely, stressed, or depressed even.

Co-Founder & New Client Director of YesMore Agency, Tom Harvey, opening up the evening of talks and panel debate during Mental Health Awareness Week.

Co-Founder & New Client Director of YesMore Agency, Tom Harvey, opening up the evening of talks and panel debate during Mental Health Awareness Week. Image by Ed Brown, YesMore Agency.

So for Mental Health Awareness Week 2019, YesMore partnered with Campfire Collaborative Co-Working Spaces (where our London office is based) to host an evening of talks and industry debate about alcohol and mental health:

Could better alcohol marketing inspire a positive change in society’s relationship with alcohol by refocusing our thinking around mental health?

No mean feat. So we pulled together some of the industry’s leading minds to share some of their own expertise, and this is what they had to say:

Speakers: Creators of The World Record Egg on Instagram – Alissa Khan-Wheelan, Chris Godfrey and CJ Brown.

If you haven’t heard of The World Record Egg, I can only assume you’ve been living in an Instagram-less hole far away from the internet. Why? Because 5 BILLION (yes, really) others knew about it earlier this year.

CJ Brown and Alissa Khan-Wheelan, two of the three people behind The World Record Egg on Instagram

CJ Brown (left) and Alissa Khan-Wheelan (right), two of the three people behind The World Record Egg on Instagram, presenting at YesMore Agency, London. Image by Andy Commons, Photographer.

“We got 1 million likes in the first 10 days”

Go check out @World_Record_Egg on Instagram, it’s currently the Internet’s most viral thing in its history and currently holds the record for the most liked image on Instagram (53 million likes) after 3 social-savvy Londoners got together to try to beat the previous record (18 million likes) held by Kylie Jenner.

“It increased traffic to mental health charities by 142,000% and they’re still getting donations from it each day which is really incredible”

Not only did they smash the record, but they used their newfound global influence as a force for good: improving mental health.

Chris Godfrey, co-creator of the @World_Record_Egg on Instagram, presenting how they grew it to be the most viral thing in the history of the internet.

Chris Godfrey, co-creator of the @World_Record_Egg on Instagram, presenting how they grew it to be the most viral thing in the history of the internet. Image by Andy Commons, Photographer.

Speaker: Paul Stollery, Co-Founder of Hype Collective and co-creator (with YesMore Agency) of The Alcohol Issue.

Next up was Paul Stollery of Hype Collective, a student marketing agency that YesMore Agency has partnered with to conduct original research into student attitudes and behaviours towards alcohol.

Paul Stollery of Hype Collective, student marketing agency, presenting key findings from a YesMore Agency partnership study into youth attitudes towards alcohol and mental health.

Paul Stollery of Hype Collective, student marketing agency, presenting key findings from a YesMore Agency partnership study into youth attitudes towards alcohol and mental health. Image by Andy Commons, Photographer.

He gave a sneak peek into the results we’ve found so far, including insight into students’ perception and consciousness of mental health – particularly if and when it influences their decision to drink alcohol or not.

“1/3rd of students interviewed said they’d made decisions to drink less because of how it affected their mental health”

Paul pulled out sections and stats from our report findings, including fascinating insight around the age-old stigma of having to hold a drink in your hand on a night out with friends. In short: students don’t have the same stigma that many of us have grown up with.

We’re planning to release the report in a few weeks time, so unfortunately if you weren’t in the room you’ll have to wait until we release the report. Send me an email here if you want to be amongst the first to see it.

Speaker: Emma Hancock, creator of Fruit Loops podcast and Account Manager at YesMore Agency.

Our very own Emma Hancock took to the stage to introduce her own podcast, Fruit Loops, due to launch in the coming weeks.

Emma Hancock, Account Manager at YesMore Agency and creator of the Fruit Loops Podcast - presenting why she's starting this movement.

Emma Hancock, Account Manager at YesMore Agency and creator of the Fruit Loops Podcast – presenting why she’s starting this movement. Image by Andy Commons, Photographer.

She shared how we as a society often refer to mental health as an illness, but in actual fact it’s like any other form of physical health – and so it fluctuates for everyone. We can be mentally healthy one week, but then not another.

Emma pointed out that podcasts about mental health often talk to famous people, but she’d found that people want to hear from everyday people about everyday things, starting from the bottom to encourage everyone to open up their own conversation with a positive angle.

You can follow @Fruit_Loops_Podcast on Instagram to be amongst the first to know when they go live, and get in touch with Emma here if you have a story to share about your own mental health.

Speaker: Amy Powell of PromoVeritas, a promotional marketing compliance consultancy.

Our last presentation came from Amy Powell, Client Relationship Manager at PromoVeritas. She shared more about the rules of alcohol marketing, bringing a level of expertise and understanding that was vital for the room of drinks brands, bars and drinks marketing agencies.

Amy Powell of PromoVeritas presenting insights into the mental health elements of the Portman Code, ASA Guidelines and CAP Code.

Amy Powell of PromoVeritas presenting insights into the mental health elements of the Portman Code, ASA Guidelines and CAP Code. Image by Andy Commons, Photographer.

We know all too well the regulation and legalities of alcohol marketing is a minefield, so Amy simplified it all into easy to understand bite-sized chunks of what you can and can’t do. She covered the differences between the ASA, CAP Code, Portman Code, CMA Regulations and more.

“Only 66% aged 18-34 believe paid-for influencer content is no different to paid-for advertising”

Amy raised thought-provoking questions about influencer marketing when it came to the promotion of alcohol – citing examples from the likes of pop star, Rita Ora, who promotes her co-owned Próspero Tequila brand to her 14.8m-strong Instagram audience – without mentioning fans need to be over 18/21 years old to follow/purchase. Amy noted, too, that it’s very, very likely she has a loyal fan base of teen and minors following her every move.

Rita Ora promoting her co-owned Tequila on her Instagram profile, likely with a large proportion under-age fans following her.

Rita Ora promoting her co-owned Próspero Tequila on her Instagram profile, likely with a large proportion under-age fans following her.

“51% of 18-34 year olds say their purchasing is influenced by an influencer”

Many other examples were shared, and it was pointed out that most influencers are simply unaware of the regulations and their responsibility as those with influence. Put simply, most don’t know they’re breaking the law with some of their posts.

Amy’s presentation continued and really landed on the point that we, as marketers and drinks industry professionals, have a duty of care when it comes to alcohol marketing. And also, we should get to know the regulations clearly so we don’t break them – because if we do then the notion of self-regulation, codes and rules could easily be upgraded to more stringent and non-negotiable law.

PromoVeritas are hosting a free breakfast briefing on Alcohol Marketing; the rules and regulations from 8.30am – 10am on 19th June 2019. More details and sign up info here.

Panelists sharing their views on whether alcohol marketing can improve society's relationship between mental health and alcohol, at YesMore Agency London.

Panelists sharing their views on whether alcohol marketing can improve society’s relationship between mental health and alcohol, at YesMore Agency London. From left; Amy Powell of PromoVeritas, Luke Boase of Lucky Saint beer, Paul Stollery of Hype Collective, Alissa Khan-Wheelan of @World_Record_Egg, Alex Carlton of STRYYK zero proof spirit, Shane McCarthy of Ireland Craft Beverages, and Tom Harvey of YesMore Agency. Image by Andy Commons, Photographer.

After a short loo and top-up break, we dived into what can only be described as an EYE OPENING panel debate to explore whether alcohol marketing could have an influence on our society’s relationship with drinking alcohol. Panelists included:

“The egg has challenged brands to talk about mental health, because they want to be associated with us and they can only do so if they align with our mission to improve mental health.”
Alissa Khan-Wheelan, co-creator of @World_Record_Egg

“We’ve found evidence to show that students are no longer peer pressured to drink alcohol on a night out (except for those in sporting teams)”
Paul Stollery, Co-Founder of Hype Collective

“We’re a zero proof spirit, but we’ll never target under 18s as we don’t want to encourage kids to move onto drinking alcohol”
Alex Carlton, CEO & Founder of STRYYK zero proof spirit & Funkin Cocktails

“It’s about making alcohol free drinks aspirational in themselves, rather than simply being the non-alcohol version of another brand”
Luke Boase, CEO & Founder of Lucky Saint 0.5% beer

“If we keep opening up the conversation about mental health it will have an effect on the industry”
Shane McCarthy, CEO & Founder of Ireland Craft Beverages & a new mental health charity launching soon

“There is a place for humour and hijacking when it comes to alcohol marketing, but  towing the line is challenging. It’s worth sense checking, because sometimes running away with an idea can get you in trouble.”
Amy Powell, Client Relationship Manager at PromoVeritas – Promotional Marketing Compliance Consultancy

Overall the night was clearly the very beginning of a topic that sparked both massive interest and much debate. We ran slightly over, with everyone in the room captivated in the conversation – each wanting to ask more. So it’s clear there’s much more to do in both the marketing and the drinks industry to pay closer attention to mental health when it comes to the marketing of alcohol. We’re seeing the likes of Diageo with their Guinness Clear ads, and Heineken with their I need a hero ads, taking steps towards removing the stigma of not drinking – but is there more we can do on a grass roots level? We all agreed that further education, awareness and general consciousness of metal health amongst the industry is valuable, and that we as brands and marketers should challenge the societal norms set before us.

Finally, a massive thank you to our partners for the evening:

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) emailJobs@Yesmore.co.uk

If you want to get back to the main site just click this way.

Sausage dog standing on a windowsill drinking beer like a boss

Carlsberg say their Lager was probably piss

April 16th, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing, Beer, Creative Review 0 thoughts on “Carlsberg say their Lager was probably piss”

This Carlsberg article was written by Tony Malcolm, Creative Director and Non-Exec at YesMore Agency. Follow Tony Malcolm on Linkedin here.

Image of Carlsberg billboard proclaiming its probably not the best beer in the world

 

The word ‘probably’ has served Carlsberg well over the last few decades.

It has allowed them to allude that their product actually is the best lager in the world, but of course, the advertising authorities will not let them make such an overtly competitive claim.

Lager drinkers were able to pass their own judgement on this claim made by Carlsberg, that has been a staple of many bars up and down the UK on draft, in bottles and in cans.

Most lager ‘connoisseurs’ were not exactly the discerning type and as long as it didn’t burn a hole in your pocket when out on the lash with the lads, it would pass muster and be necked back with gusto.

Sausage dog standing on a windowsill drinking beer like a boss

It was at this point that lager connoisseurs became lager louts as they spilled out onto the streets scrapping with all and sundry, especially around football occasions where the pitch-side hoardings flashed up the Carlsberg logo as the foul-mouthed chants rained down from the terraces.

But something is happening in lager land. People are drinking less alcohol, but at a higher quality and price . It’s no big surprise that as micro breweries start flooding the market with far more palatable brews, that Carlsberg thought they should ‘probably’ get with the programme.

From brewing in quantity, they now believe they have to start concentrating on quality with a new premium pilsner lager. To move their reputation up a few notches, they feel they have to highlight their past transgressions.

Was Carlsberg lager brewed for the mass market really the best lager in the world? Probably not. In fact, definitely not.

Animated GIF of Carlsberg beer being picked up

In a rather refreshing, yet surprising twist, Carlsberg have admitted they lost their way and concentrated on quantity, not quality and are promoting the negative tweets about their previous brew. Tweets that say their old lager tasted like ‘stale breadsticks’ or ‘the piss of Satan’.

It brings to mind the problem faced by Stella Artois when they went in the opposite direction. From running ads about how their lager was ‘Reassuringly Expensive’, it suddenly got the moniker of ‘wife-beater’ when they started selling it through supermarket chains for less than the price of bottled water.

Recent Carlsberg work has started to add an air of lager sophistication to their comms, like the Danish King Canute trying to stop the tide.

Messages like ‘Brewed from Head to Hop’, sounds more like the language of CAMRA than Carlsberg.

Green Carlsberg bottles

This new twist seems like a bit of a gamble. Negativity around a brand has worked for the likes of Marmite, which has become synonymous with the idea that some love the product and some hate it.

I suppose Carlsberg is a yeast extract based product too in that respect.

We at YesMore admire their bravery, but wonder whether it verges a bit too far on the side of insanity.

Dissing their own product and siding with the haters, smacks of being disingenuous. Like the Brexit politicians ringing their hands when found out their former claims were dishonest.

We will never again be fooled by their probably line, now they have highlighted it’s leanings towards the ‘probably not’ end of the scale.

Perhaps their campaign about to break for their new premium pilsner will salvage their diminished brewing reputation. Perhaps their disarming transparency will pay off. Mads Mikkelsen, the Danish actor might charm us into overlooking how they fobbed us off with an inferior beer in the past.

Can of Carlsberg beer

Carlsberg have experienced a drop off in sales of 1.7% to its lowest point in two years. This is point where they hope they can turn that tide.

With a £20 million spend behind it, new fount and flash chalice glasses, failure will not be an option.

We hope for their sakes, they’re not throwing their new pilsner baby out with the stale breadsticks tasting bathwater.

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk 

If you want to get back to the main site just click this way.

 

How Has Pub Marketing Changed?

February 26th, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing 0 thoughts on “How Has Pub Marketing Changed?”

Original article written by Emma Eversham, published in The Morning Advertiser on 15th of February 2019. Please follow the link in the right hand panel under industry news titled, “How Has Pub Marketing Changed?” for the original.

There are so many rules around advertising now, be them from the Advertising Standards Authority or the Portman Group. Here we highlight some of the defining moments in marketing and advertising and look at how regulation and legislation has changed the way drinks brands and pubs market their products and services. This spring, the sixth edition of the Portman Group’s code of practice will be published, with some additional guidelines to address areas such as sexism in marketing and implications that alcohol can improve mood, expected to be included.

Introduced in 1996 to ensure alcohol is named, packaged and promoted responsibly, the code has drawn its critics from some parts of the industry, who have found it overly restrictive, while others outside the industry believe that its regulatory, rather than compulsory nature, does not go far enough in tackling problems associated with alcohol. Alongside the Portman Group’s code of practice are the Advertising Standards Authority’s [ASA) Committee of Advertising Practice [CAP) code and Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice code giving specific guidance on how alcohol can be marketed and advertised through any form of communication to consumers- from a full page advert in a glossy magazine to a 60-second ad on TV.

Since these codes were introduced, the advertising and marketing landscape for anyone involved in the sale of alcohol has dramatically altered. The list suggesting what you cannot say, or even imply when promoting a bottle of booze is a long one, and navigating the guidance can seem like yet another burden on an already struggling industry, although it is generally accepted that this has helped stimulate creativity.

SOCIAL MEDIA TRANSFORMED THE SCENE

Image by Erik_Lucatero on Pixabay

Nevertheless, for many like Jim Shearer, marketing and consumer excellence director at Molson Coors Brewing Company, adhering to codes are simply part of the territory if you’re involved in selling alcoholic beverages.

“We believe in the responsible marketing of alcohol to adults and embrace the Portman Group and ASA codes, as well as the global alcohol industry Digital Guiding Principles and our own commercial code,” he says. “We don’t see them as restrictions as such – just a part of the way we do business.”

Dan Hooper, director of client services at alcohol marketing agency YesMore, has worked with both alcohol brands and the Portman Group. Like Shearer, he regards the regulations as a framework for brands to work within and, importantly, an attempt at addressing societal problems such as underage, or binge drinking.

“The Portman Group and the ASA aren’t here to ruin everyone’s good time, they are literally trying to do a good job of influencing a healthy drinking culture in the UK,” he says. “I don’t ever think they’re trying to ruin anyone’s brand or water down anything they’re trying to do. I think people just need to potentially think things through. There’s a way of being cheeky and funny and witty without having to resort to non-approved language.”

It is this last point that rings true with many involved in drinks marketing. Regulation hasn’t necessarily meant restriction and in some ways has led drinks brands and pubs to seek-out creative ways to get their brand or business noticed.

EMBRACING CHANGE

Indeed, the trade had embraced the Portman Group’s code of practice so well that by 2010, only five complaints regarding irresponsible alcohol advertising were mace to the watchdog, with just two upheld by the group’s independent panel. Molson Coors’ Shearer believes the ‘digital revolution’ enabled the industry to become creative in its marketing approach once again because age restrictions meant promotions could directly target the over-18s.

“The rise of social media and video on-demand over the past decade or so has made it easier for drinks producers to market specifically to an over-18s audience, he says. “That ability to be so tailored has allowed the industry to fully embrace the regulations, while reaching an adult consumer in a creative and engaging way.”

Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

Hooper believes the arrival of social media was the real defining moment in marketing for pubs because it suddenly gave them an easy access route to people outside their doors. “Before social media, a pub didn’t have too many ways of having its voice heard. If it wanted to advertise a certain drink it stocked, a themed night or a drinks promotion, other than spending a lot on a print campaign, there wasn’t any way they could reach thousands,” he says. “The advent of social media really changed what they could do and what they said. Even if you were the smallest pub in London and had a zero budget, the advent of social media meant that suddenly you had a voice and could reach people all over.”

“It’s the culture that has shifted the use of the pub, not Portman or the ASA,”

 

YesMore Client Services Director, Daniel Hooper

RATHER LIKE THE WILD WEST

As Hooper points out, however, the new social media frontier was a little like the Wild West when it was first introduced, leaving pubs and drinks brands free to share content that would not comply with the ASA’s or Portman’s guidelines if it had been on TV or in print “When it arrived, the ASA were sort of looking away, .. he continues. ‘”I liken it to a house party when the parents weren’t around”. The ASA and Portman Group soon returned home, however, and set some new ground rules. In 2009, the Portman Group published its guide The Responsible Marketing of Alcoholic Drinks in Digital Media, advising companies how to stay within its and the CAP’s codes, meaning social media would be subjected to the same guidelines as those for other media.

Having strict rules on drinks marketing across all platforms hasn’t helped with the fact that pubs are struggling to attract customers and are closing at the rate of 18 a week according to the latest figures from the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA). Nevertheless, those who work in advertising and marketing don’t believe that the rules and regulations enforced by the Portman Group or the ASA are to blame for pub closures.

Image by Christian_Birkholz on Pixabay

“It’s the culture that has shifted the use of the pub, not Portman or the ASA,” says Hooper. “When I talk to my dad, who’s in his 60s, about what the pub was like then, he describes it as a very different place to how I know it now and it was different for his father, so it’s something that shifts generationally. Culturally, people aren’t going down the pub as much as they were and just aren’t drinking the same amount of alcohol. Taxes have made drinks less affordable too, so it’s not marketing as such, it’s that the way the pub is used that has changed.”

NEW ATTITUDE TO DRINKING

Airbnb could have been just another accommodation provider but it remained true to the value it adds and positioned itself as a service that will allow people to really know what it feels like to live in their holiday destination.

Pubs similarly need to redefine their role in society and return to being a much-needed force for good that brings people together.

 

Amit Patel, lead strategist at TBWA London

According to stats from Red Brick Research, almost a quarter of Generation Z (those born between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s) identify as teetotal and 70% regard binge drinking as ‘very risky’. Therefore, marketing campaigns with alcohol at their centre may not be the best way to go.

“When I’m speaking to Generation Z, they are genuinely not interested in alcohol, they think getting drunk is stupid, unhealthy and looks embarrassing,” says Hooper.

Amit Patel, lead strategist at TBWA London, which has created advertising campaigns for Pernod Ricard brands for more than 25 years, believes we are currently at a ‘defining moment in pub marketing’ and challenges the industry to reposition itself to attract customers now and in the future.

“With 18 pubs a week closing in 2018, we desperately need a pivot that can address the pub’s declining relevance, particularly with younger generations,” he asserts. “To combat the fact that people are either staying at home where entertainment is at their fingertips – think: Netflix – or opting to spend time in different environments like casual dining, the great British pub needs to reposition itself as something more than just a boozer, they need to rethink what they are, and what they provide beyond drinks and a place to sit.”

Patel says the ‘key switch’ in marketing strategy to attract more customers lies in ‘transforming the customer experience’ rather than finding ways to make people drink more alcohol. He believes giving customers access to experiences they would not be able to get anywhere other than in the pub is one strategy and making it about a welcoming meeting space is another.

“Airbnb could have been just another accommodation provider but it remained true to the value it adds and positioned itself as a service that will allow people to really know what it feels like to live in their holiday destination,” he explains. “Pubs similarly need to redefine their role in society and return to being a much-needed force for good that brings people together.”

LEARNING FROM TOBACCO

Ben Barton, business director at creative agency Space, agrees, while also suggesting that pubs learn from the tobacco industry, which is no longer permitted to communicate directly with customers. Instead, many tobacco companies have developed retailer engagement programs to help switch existing adult smokers to their brands by converting retailers into brand advocates.

Photo by Alistair MacRobert on Unsplash

He says: “As legislation tightens and advertising becomes more restrictive, pubs must shift their focus and find new ways of influencing customers. There are a number of ways to do this – recently, for example, there’s been a growth in engagement between bar owners and outlet staff. With a high percentage of drinks choices being made at the point of purchase, the role of the bar staff is becoming more and more important in driving brand advocacy.”

Focusing more on brand recommendations and the unique experience a pub can provide, rather than making it about a place to drink, could not only help the pub sector’s future, but could also avoid further marketing and advertising regulations being introduced, or being subject to legislation, Barton believes. “Given the direction the UK market is heading, I wouldn’t be surprised if we start to mirror countries like France and introduce something similar to ‘The Evin Law’ – where content of ads is restricted and only brand assets such as logos are allowed,” he says,
recommending that pub and drinks brands invest in ‘brand assets’ now to ensure messaging is clear should this happen.

“Before communication legislation tightens, [businesses] need to be imbued with the desired positioning and image that the brand wants to project, It’s also important to develop robust social and brand ambassador strategies to ensure a brand stays front of mind,” he concludes.

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk 

If you want to get back to the main site just click this way.

Photo by Wyron A

Booze Views: Not another 2019 trends article

January 30th, 2019 Posted by Alcohol Marketing 0 thoughts on “Booze Views: Not another 2019 trends article”

It’s crystal-ball-gazing time. What do you mean you’ve only read 28 Biggest trends to look out for in 2019 pieces throughout the month?! All touting blockchain, something influencery and some nonsense about artisan pisco? That’s nowhere your quota for January.

So just in the nick of time before January ends, strap in and come with me on a completely arbitrary journey through a set of predictions grounded roughly 20% in data and logic, 50% in my ad hoc reckoning and 30% in stuff you’ll find at least 119% more entertaining than every other one of these articles…

MORE QUESTIONABLE EXTENSIONS OF IPA

It’s the abbreviation (not acronym) beer marketers love to mess with. Last year it was all about NEIPA (‘N-E-I-P-A?’ ‘Neepa?’ Don’t waste your time.). But DIPA, RIPA, IIPA and BIPA (which has at least three potential meanings at last count) have all played their part in fostering that fuzzy warm feeling of putrid smugness among craft hipsters who bandy them around just desperately hoping you’ll betray your pathetic ignorance by asking what the letters stand for.

Know-it-all bashing aside, it’s the beer market trend that keeps on giving – the people want their IPA, and they want it different. This year will be no exception and there will be yet another year-defining sub-style. Brut was something of a slow burn last year and could see a mainstream boost that will push it to the forefront of 2019, but I’m still waiting to see what this year’s next-big-thing will be in the seemingly saturation-proof world of IPA.

Photo by Jonas Jacobsson

MORE FOCUS ON ENGLISH WINE – BUT NOT EXACTLY MARKET DOMINANCE 

Brexit. Brexit Brexit Brexit. Good, now we’ve addressed that in sufficient depth we can move on. Seriously, it’s still anyone’s guess as to exactly what it’s going to mean for the drinks sector. But there will undoubtedly be a greater focus on home-produced booze, whether that’s simply media guff and publicity stunts rather than genuinely level-headed, reasoned and transparent business decisions (ahem).

The obvious spotlight contender is British wine, and I predict that many will be touting the sleeping giant that is the UK wine industry. An interesting post from online wine shop Vincarta puts this in context – according to the author, countries that produce more wine than the UK currently include Jordan and Malta. Malta is less than half the size of London. Though growth seems an entirely realistic prospect, the reality may not live up to the hype that I reckon is about to come.

Photo by Suda Guan

VOICE TECHNOLOGY WILL HAVE AN IMPACT ON ALCOHOL SALES…

… roughly equivalent to that of a gerbil farting in the Mongolian tundra.

Sorry, couldn’t resist. But if you read enough trends articles you’ll be as sick of hearing about voice as I am. For the best part of two years it’s been second only to blockchain (pahahahaha) as marketing’s favourite white elephant. Let’s draw a line in the sand*: voice tech is great for menial home tasks and, for the vast majority, it’s basically a robot butler whose sole function is to change the radio station.

Where it could have a knock-on impact: increasing listener figures for DAB and streaming platforms could become more attractive for above-the-line spend. But with the attendant regulatory concerns, that’s unlikely to have a huge impact on booze.

*The nice thing about lines in the sand is they’re very easy to brush away…

50-SOMETHINGS WILL RUN RIOT IN A HEDONISTIC 

BACKLASH AGAINST YEARS OF AUSTERITY 

AND THE SOUR-FACED PRIMNESS OF THEIR TEENAGED OFFSPRING

What it says, really. I’ve written before about my thoughts on the marketing world’s youth obsession. And I certainly don’t claim to be a sole outlier in that respect – I wasn’t the first to call bullshit on the frequently black-and-white interpretations of Strauss-Howe, and I sense a genuine turning of the tide this year. If youngsters really are the straight-faced teetotallers they’re made out to be then the obvious money is on their boozehound parents. It’ll be interesting to see if marketing tactics do start to skew any older this year.

Here’s an image of some young people not drinking… POW!

Photo by Zachary Nelson

HOPLESS BEERS

The primary driver will be pure faddism, but there are actually two other factors at play that I reckon make a solid case for this.

Firstly, the trend is also likely to be driven by the ever-increasing environmental awareness that everyone likes to attribute everything to. It’s simple: hops are very, very water-intensive to grow, and there’s growing media interest in that.

And lastly there’s brewing’s constant search for the Next Big Thing. Say what you like about the craft sector’s incessant pursuit of new flavours and trends, it’s created a climate where it’s incumbent on independent brewers to be continually rolling out new products. It’s what we’ve come to expect.

The starry-eyed may laud the spirit of constant exploration; cynics may call it a convenient way of avoiding market saturation. But if craft brewing has shown one thing over recent years, it’s that there’s a seemingly inexhaustible interest in and a market for new beer styles. But, frankly, brewers are running out of material.

Photo by Elevate

My prediction: a wave of hopless beers with a focus on Lithuanian kaimiskas. You read it here first.

Lithuanian farmhouse ales – huge in 2019…

Cheers,

Rich

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk 

If you want to get back to the main site just click this way.

Booze Views: Why Dry January Can Be a Great Time for Alcohol Marketers

December 18th, 2018 Posted by Alcohol Marketing 0 thoughts on “Booze Views: Why Dry January Can Be a Great Time for Alcohol Marketers”

BOOZE VIEWS: WHY DRY JANUARY CAN BE A GREAT TIME FOR ALCOHOL MARKETERS

You’ve got Christmas sewn up – but what about the New Year? While the world at large is going about convincing itself that January is a time of new beginnings, new approaches and new mindsets (as opposed to excess-induced guilt, drudgery and seasonal affective disorder), it’s basically time for the drinks biz to sit on its hands, right?

Well, if that’s starting a little cynically for you, fear not – because this post is all about how Dry January can be a ray of winter sunshine in the alcohol marketer’s life (and vice versa, believe it or not).

There are any number of ways in which the issue is rather more complex than turkeys voting for Christmas; so here are just a few reasons why people not drinking booze can be a good thing for the alcohol industry (and how alcohol marketers can help)…

close-up-drink-drinking-glass-1346155.jpg

Ye could put a goldfish in that and it wouldn’t even die. – Mitchell and Webb

THAT WHOLE NEW BEGINNINGS THING

Reset, reconsider, refresh – that’s what we’re told January is all about. At least, that’s very possibly how your customers see it.

Of course, the traditional view of January is as a bit of downtime in live campaign activity so you can cook up the next few months. So may I suggest to…

…live in the now, man.

Follow the general public’s example and view it as a chance to reconsider your approach – whether that’s strategy, approach, values, messaging; your audience is probably more receptive to change than ever, so if you’re thinking about any kind of repositioning activity, the New Year could be the time.

IT’S A CHANCE TO KEEP AN EAR TO THE GROUND

The cliché surrounding Dry January is well-worn: a month of self-flagellating abstinence followed by an immediate spiral into excess and return to self-loathing that only hair of the dog will cure.

As with any cliché, there’s some truth to it, but, as I posited last month, the mindset it’s predicated on may be dwindling. The jury is still out on whether Dry January itself has long-term benefits, but the culture of excess that implies the big month’s necessity is losing its force.

Quality is increasingly trumping quantity in the booze market – and the conversation around Dry January 2019 is likely to reflect that. Keep close tabs on what’s being said and how Dry Jan plays out; it could give you some invaluable audience insights.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

IT’S YOUR CHANCE TO GET STRATEGIC

With that in mind, the coming year, perhaps more than any before, is going to be about building sustainability into alcohol marketing strategies.

There are no two ways about it – 2019 is already showing some real promise at turning out to be an absolute shitter of a year. Sorry – didn’t quite leave the cynicism in paragraph 1. Well, it’s not Christmas yet.

THE OPPORTUNITY: EMBRACE DRY JANUARY

Just to be absolutely clear, I do not mean ‘market your non-alcoholic beer’.

Actually get involved in Dry January. Take part in it. Talk about it. Create content about it. I have yet to see an alcohol brand really go all-in on Dry January. Now, that’s for the very obvious reason that it has immense potential to blow up in your face spectacularly.

As an alcohol brand, embracing Dry January is probably less sticking your neck out than it is building the guillotine in a very public place and handing the release mechanism to the nearest psychopath.

A crass marketing-led approach to embracing Dry January is, of course, doomed to fail in a way that would make Pepsi and Kendall Jenner look like Cannes Lion contenders. No one wants to be the brand that gets destroyed for trying to cash in on Dry January.

📷 – Teen Vogue

Don’t do that. Obviously.

Instead, be authentic. Actually care about it. Come up with some ways you can contribute by tackling head-on the problems that make Dry January such a big deal. Address their root causes. Naturally you need a very (and I mean very) well-thought-out comms plans in place to even think about getting involved, but it is doable. And if you do it right, by being a truly responsible alcohol brand with a positive message, your positivity will very likely come back at you in spades.

REEVALUATE, RETHINK, RE-POSITION 

Elton John is bloody everywhere this November, so permit me a crude comparison between the circular nature of life that he brought our attention to in such glorious transatlantic pub singer fashion, and that of this very article. I am, of course, returning to the idea of re-positioning.

January is a time to rethink about what you stand for as a purveyor of booze. Sure, you could be the brand that’s there waiting eagerly at the saloon door to 1st February with a beer bong to slosh as much piss as you can down the gullets of the thirsty masses. But, in short, that’s not a great look. Dry January 2019 is only going to increase the volume and the breadth of the discussion around alcohol consumption, and the industry will do well to have ready answers and something sensible to say. Now’s the time to plan.

Cheers,

Rich

Hope you enjoyed the article. For more good reads, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol, you can sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ newsletter or follow YesMore Agency on Linkedin.

If you’d like to hire our excellent team contact hello@Yesmore.co.uk (for both US & UK work) or if working with us sounds fun (it is) email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk 

If you want to get back to the main site just click this way.

Remote Working from a laptop overlooking a pool in California USA

Do More Work, Don’t Go Into the Office. Our Take On Remote Working.

December 10th, 2018 Posted by Life / Work Balance, Social Media 0 thoughts on “Do More Work, Don’t Go Into the Office. Our Take On Remote Working.”

“Remote working” – one of the buzz phrases of our decade. Some see it as the lazy millennial’s way to avoid “real” work, others see it as an innovative way to be more productive, efficient and deliver better quality work as a whole. Either way, as I write this article I’m remote working from the Royal Festival Hall on London’s Southbank, overlooking the River Thames glistening in the morning sunlight. It’s a gorgeous day, I’m enjoying a great coffee and I’m surrounded by nervous-excited graduates, dressed up being admired by their proud families. It. Is. Buzzing. I am inspired.

Why am I here and not in an office like most other agencies? Because I chose to be. Why did I choose to be here?  So I could get more work done.

I just don’t work nearly as well in an office as I do elsewhere, on my own terms. When I need to knuckle down and get shit done, this is what I do. I get out of the office, away from actual distractions and into an environment like this. Remote working works for me.

I once said to a former employer: “Hey, what if we gave everyone in the company the option to work remotely once a month?” and was shut down completely without any real rationale or reason. When I suggested the same to another employer I was told “we can’t trust them to actually do any work” this surprised me entirely.  

I felt that if that was really the case then why did you hire these people? I wondered if the team would actually respect the employer more, and thus do more work, if they were given this option. Both times I had suggested the idea of remote working from a point of view to IMPROVE productivity for the business, not hinder it.

Sitting here now, I look around and see young people proudly taking selfies with their degrees and throwing their hats in the air for the perfect Boomerang (the social app, not the Aboriginal hunting implement) and thinking… how do these people want to work for their future employers? What do they demand for their lifestyle? How can I build my business to inspire them to deliver our clients more than the average agency?

There must be good reason why Shoreditch House looks more like a work space than a members club during the week, why WeWork, Spacious and Workshop Cafe are booming all over the world. Additionally, co-working spaces like Campfire have proven (to us at least) to go out of their way to help businesses like ours, with teams that you could go for a beer with after work.

We were one of the first companies to sign up for Spacious in Brooklyn, we’ve both witnessed it growing from strength to strength. There is a huge market for a flexible, affordable place to work, to share ideas and to drink coffee. Shouldn’t have to cost the equivalent of your rent in order to get this experience.

Even Slack the MSN style comms tool is so integral to companies around the world now – and both our Carluccio’s and Regal Rogue clients have rolled out Slack across their businesses thanks in part to our advice. Many businesses can struggle with closed minded perceptions of how things are done. But why can’t we go against the grain if the end result is better?

So far, YesMore Agency is only 13 months old (at the time of writing this). We helped grow results for 13 clients and we’ve had 10 staff work at YesMore – all without ever being in the same room. We’ve had our team working as they would in an office but on their own terms from London, New York, Ireland, California, Brighton, Hawaii, Scotland, Philadelphia, Amsterdam, Spain, Poland and more.

Dan, my business partner, lives in Brooklyn New York whilst I live in East London – we speak every day (and collaborate seamlessly) whilst only actually having worked in the same room for 9 working days so far in the business. We just don’t need to. In fact, we’re more productive when we don’t.

Not sure about you but this doesn’t inspire much in us

We’ve hired people with a work ethic like ours, we trust everyone to deliver on the promises they make and we all communicate instinctively. And when people don’t pull their weight you actually notice it more in the drop on deliverables, whilst in an office you can whittle hours away hiding hungover behind your screen.

As a result, all of our clients are happy. I believe that’s down to us and our team being allowed (encouraged even) to work in more productive environments. Above all else enabling us to continue being passionate and dedicated to both our work and our lives.

Dan and I are discussing how this will manifest itself in the future. We’ve got a good idea of our direction but will always have questions… Will we always allow our teams to work remotely? What problems could we encounter? What do our clients think? Do we tell our clients? Will people’s perceptions hold us back? What is the future of the service agency? Do people want to commute to an uninspiring environment? Can our team work from our client’s spaces for added creativity?

“Great ideas start out as polarising, they either really tug on someone’s emotions or they really perturb them in some way” – Joe Gebbia, Airbnb

When we talk about this way of working it’s already becoming very clear that some people LOVE it. At the same time some people think we’re idiots. Exciting. So re-listening to the How I Built This podcast interview with Joe Gebbia, founder of Airbnb, this morning I’m inspired to see what YOU think too.

What’s your point of view on building an agency around flexible and remote working?

Be brutal if you want, we’re thick skinned and love the challenge of both criticism and belief.

Thanks to Southbank Centre for the wifi and view of the river Thames. I’m now going downstairs for a quick skate and a sandwich in the sun before getting back onto work after lunch refreshed.

Hope you enjoyed the read. For more opinion, interviews and news from the wonderful world of alcohol marketing sign up to our monthly ‘Top 5 Alcohol Marketing Stories‘ email, takes just 25 second read each month and arms you with fascinating stories.

If working with us sounds fun, email Jobs@Yesmore.co.uk Or if you’d like to hire our excellent team just say hello – hello@Yesmore.co.uk

woman holding sparkler on the beach

Alcohol Marketing News Top 5 Stories: #014 – December

November 29th, 2018 Posted by Alcohol Marketing 0 thoughts on “Alcohol Marketing News Top 5 Stories: #014 – December”

This post first appeared as an email newsletter to our subscribers, who receive 5 top stories from the world of Alcohol Marketing each month – subscribe here to get it in your inbox each month. Your December digest of the latest and greatest from the world of alcohol marketing, by the team at YesMore Agency.

Merry Christmas from YesMore Agency!

YES, YES, WE KNOW IT’S EARLY BUT WE’VE BEEN IN THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT(S) SINCE JUNE FOR MOST OF OUR CLIENTS AND WE WON’T GET ANOTHER CHANCE BEFORE CRIMBO… SO… MERRY CHRISTMAS YA FILTHY ANIMAL.

 

BACARDI INNOVATE WITH INSTAGRAM DRUM MACHINE

Play a track on your phone. Open up @BacardiUSA on mobile. Then press and hold on their latest 12 posts to drop sound effects into your listening experience. Very clever way to use the platform and will likely grow their audience, too. More on FAB News.

Drinks-Retailing-News-Mindful-Drinking-Buyers-Guide-YesMore-Agency

DRINKS RETAILING NEWS RELEASES A MINDFUL DRINKING GUIDE. HERE.

EVER WONDERED WHAT IT TAKES TO DESIGN A KICKASS BEER LABEL?

EVENTS TO CHECK OUT THIS DECEMBER

Brooklyn Craft Spirits Fest: 1st Dec
#BrooklynCraftSpiritsFest // $15 – $70

Seedlip Pop Up Gift Shop: til 8th Dec
@SeedlipDrinks // 10am-7pm // FREE

Brewgooder is Crowdfunding:
Fund, get beer & fix wells in Malawi!
@BrewGooder // #DrinkBeerGiveWater
~ Ends 10th Dec! ~

regal-rogue-vermouth-bottles-yesmore-agency

OUR REGAL ROGUE CLIENT IS GOING SKY HIGH AS THE EXCLUSIVE VERMOUTH ON ALL VIRGIN ATLANTIC FLIGHTS & CLUBHOUSES AROUND THE WORLD! PLUS, THEY’VE OPENED UP INVESTOR OPPORTUNITIES – GET AN INTRO TO THE OWNER NOW.


 

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Additionally, if you want a quarterly update of what’s going on at YesMore Agency, sign up here.